Economic Crimes

Economic Crimes

Economic Crimes

Economic crimes account for nearly one-tenth, or ten percent, of federal caseload and investigations due to encompassing a wide variety of conduct. An economic crime is defined as illegal acts perpetrated by an individual or a group of individuals to secure professional advantage or economic gain.

Typical examples of economic crimes include tax evasion, cyber crimes, robbery, sale of controlled substances, market abuse, insider trading, and abuse of federal economic aid (SNAP, EBT, disability, etc.).

The severity of such charges, if convicted, can carry prison sentences ranging from five (5) months to 52 months or longer. A conviction may also impact your career, prevent future employment, affect your ability to obtain credit, or disqualify you from Federal Benefits.

Economic crimes account for nearly one-tenth, or ten percent, of federal caseload and investigations due to encompassing a wide variety of conduct. An economic crime is defined as illegal acts perpetrated by an individual or a group of individuals to secure professional advantage or economic gain.

Typical examples of economic crimes include tax evasion, cyber crimes, robbery, sale of controlled substances, market abuse, insider trading, and abuse of federal economic aid (SNAP, EBT, disability, etc.).

The severity of such charges, if convicted, can carry prison sentences ranging from five (5) months to 52 months or longer. A conviction may also impact your career, prevent future employment, affect your ability to obtain credit, or disqualify you from Federal Benefits.

Economic crimes account for nearly one-tenth, or ten percent, of federal caseload and investigations due to encompassing a wide variety of conduct. An economic crime is defined as illegal acts perpetrated by an individual or a group of individuals to secure professional advantage or economic gain.

Typical examples of economic crimes include tax evasion, cyber crimes, robbery, sale of controlled substances, market abuse, insider trading, and abuse of federal economic aid (SNAP, EBT, disability, etc.).

The severity of such charges, if convicted, can carry prison sentences ranging from five (5) months to 52 months or longer. A conviction may also impact your career, prevent future employment, affect your ability to obtain credit, or disqualify you from Federal Benefits.

If you or your loved one is in need of representation for a criminal charge, LaHood Norton is ready to help. For a free review of your case contact the Law Offices of LaHood Norton at (210) 797-7700 Monday – Friday. The legal system can be overwhelming. You need a legal team that will take your case seriously and fight for you.