DWI (Misdemeanor and Felony)

DWI (Misdemeanor and Felony)

DWI (Misdemeanor and Felony)

A misdemeanor DWI does not require a preliminary hearing or convening of a grand jury, although a felony DWI case would. The course of a misdemeanor DWI is as follows: a person is arrested, charged, arraigned, has a pretrial conference, if the case doesn’t plead out at pretrial then goes to trial. When a felony is involved, you can expect several court proceedings leading up to the trial, with a minimum of one year in prison or more depending on the case. The collateral consequences of having a felony on your record could result in losing your voting rights, not being able to serve on a jury, and possibly losing your right to legally own a gun.

Prosecutors can charge a felony DWI in different situations. Such as:

  • More than three DWIs in a 10-year period (even if all three priors are misdemeanors)
  • DWI causing injury, great bodily harm, or even death
  • DWI with a minor in the vehicle
  • DWI while driving on a suspended license for a prior DWI

A misdemeanor DWI does not require a preliminary hearing or convening of a grand jury, although a felony DWI case would. The course of a misdemeanor DWI is as follows: a person is arrested, charged, arraigned, has a pretrial conference, if the case doesn’t plead out at pretrial then goes to trial. When a felony is involved, you can expect several court proceedings leading up to the trial, with a minimum of one year in prison or more depending on the case. The collateral consequences of having a felony on your record could result in losing your voting rights, not being able to serve on a jury, and possibly losing your right to legally own a gun.

Prosecutors can charge a felony DWI in different situations. Such as:

  • More than three DWIs in a 10-year period (even if all three priors are misdemeanors)
  • DWI causing injury, great bodily harm, or even death
  • DWI with a minor in the vehicle
  • DWI while driving on a suspended license for a prior DWI

A misdemeanor DWI does not require a preliminary hearing or convening of a grand jury, although a felony DWI case would. The course of a misdemeanor DWI is as follows: a person is arrested, charged, arraigned, has a pretrial conference, if the case doesn’t plead out at pretrial then goes to trial. When a felony is involved, you can expect several court proceedings leading up to the trial, with a minimum of one year in prison or more depending on the case. The collateral consequences of having a felony on your record could result in losing your voting rights, not being able to serve on a jury, and possibly losing your right to legally own a gun.

Prosecutors can charge a felony DWI in different situations. Such as:

  • More than three DWIs in a 10-year period (even if all three priors are misdemeanors)
  • DWI causing injury, great bodily harm, or even death
  • DWI with a minor in the vehicle
  • DWI while driving on a suspended license for a prior DWI

If you or your loved one is in need of representation for a criminal charge, LaHood Norton is ready to help. For a free review of your case contact the Law Offices of LaHood Norton at (210) 797-7700 Monday – Friday. The legal system can be overwhelming. You need a legal team that will take your case seriously and fight for you.