Writs

Writs

Writs

Court writs are a document or an order from a higher court that can direct a lower court or a government official to take some sort of action. In any given trial, a defendant may appeal a case to the next higher appellate body only once, but the defendant may file multiple court writs in that same trial.

Defendants can seek several types of writs from appellate judges directed at the trial court or at a lower appellate court. Most writs will require advanced legal knowledge and involve detailed procedures. Defendants contemplating making an application for a writ are wise to consult counsel.

Federal Rules of Civil Procedure explicitly annul certain writs altogether and make most forms of relief available through either a lawsuit or motion. Some writs commonly available in state courts include:

  • Writs of certiorari, which permit the review of cases
  • Writs of habeas corpus, which challenge a prisoner’s detention
  • Writs of prohibition or injunctions, which compel or forbid actions
  • Writs of error Coram Nobis, which set aside a conviction
  • Writs of attachment, permitting the seizure of a person or property
  • Writs of capias, effectively a warrant for an arrest
  • Writs of fieri facias, commanding seizure and auction of property to pay a debt
  • Writs of venire facias, summoning jurors to appear in court

Court writs are a document or an order from a higher court that can direct a lower court or a government official to take some sort of action. In any given trial, a defendant may appeal a case to the next higher appellate body only once, but the defendant may file multiple court writs in that same trial.

Defendants can seek several types of writs from appellate judges directed at the trial court or at a lower appellate court. Most writs will require advanced legal knowledge and involve detailed procedures. Defendants contemplating making an application for a writ are wise to consult counsel.

Federal Rules of Civil Procedure explicitly annul certain writs altogether and make most forms of relief available through either a lawsuit or motion.Some writs commonly available in state courts include:

  • Writs of certiorari, which permit the review of cases
  • Writs of habeas corpus, which challenge a prisoner’s detention
  • Writs of prohibition or injunctions, which compel or forbid actions
  • Writs of error Coram Nobis, which set aside a conviction
  • Writs of attachment, permitting the seizure of a person or property
  • Writs of capias, effectively a warrant for an arrest
  • Writs of fieri facias, commanding seizure and auction of property to pay a debt
  • Writs of venire facias, summoning jurors to appear in court

Court writs are a document or an order from a higher court that can direct a lower court or a government official to take some sort of action. In any given trial, a defendant may appeal a case to the next higher appellate body only once, but the defendant may file multiple court writs in that same trial.

Defendants can seek several types of writs from appellate judges directed at the trial court or at a lower appellate court. Most writs will require advanced legal knowledge and involve detailed procedures. Defendants contemplating making an application for a writ are wise to consult counsel.

Federal Rules of Civil Procedure explicitly annul certain writs altogether and make most forms of relief available through either a lawsuit or motion. Some writs commonly available in state courts include:

  • Writs of certiorari, which permit the review of cases
  • Writs of habeas corpus, which challenge a prisoner’s detention
  • Writs of prohibition or injunctions, which compel or forbid actions
  • Writs of error Coram Nobis, which set aside a conviction
  • Writs of attachment, permitting the seizure of a person or property
  • Writs of capias, effectively a warrant for an arrest
  • Writs of fieri facias, commanding seizure and auction of property to pay a debt
  • Writs of venire facias, summoning jurors to appear in court

If you or your loved one is in need of representation for a criminal charge, LaHood Norton is ready to help. For a free review of your case contact the Law Offices of LaHood Norton at (210) 797-7700 Monday – Friday. The legal system can be overwhelming. You need a legal team that will take your case seriously and fight for you.