Assault

Assault

Assault

In many states assault and battery are treated as two separate crimes, although some treat them as the same. The reason for this is because the offenses are very closely linked: “assault” occurs when someone threatens another with imminent bodily injury, while “battery” refers to actual bodily contact ( which is either offensive or injurious in nature). Assault and battery also are considered intentional offenses, meaning you can sue someone for these actions in a civil court to get compensated for your injuries.

In Texas, the elements for a case against a defendant for assault and battery are the same, although there are many different classifications for different degrees of the offense (charged as “assault” even if the battery does occur).

  • Intentionally or knowingly threatens another with imminent bodily injury, including the person’s spouse
  • Intentionally or knowingly causes physical contact with another when the person knows or should reasonably believe that the other will regard the contact as offensive or provocative

Classifications of the Offense

  • Class C misdemeanor if a person threatens another with bodily harm or causes physical contact in a provocative or offensive way, and no other aggravating factors are present.
  • Class B misdemeanor if a person commits assault against someone who is a sports participant during a performance or in retaliation for a performance.
  • Class A misdemeanor if a person causes bodily injury to another, and no other aggravating factors are present; or if a person causes physical contact in a provocative or offensive way against an elderly individual.

In many states assault and battery are treated as two separate crimes, although some treat them as the same. The reason for this is because the offenses are very closely linked: “assault” occurs when someone threatens another with imminent bodily injury, while “battery” refers to actual bodily contact ( which is either offensive or injurious in nature). Assault and battery also are considered intentional offenses, meaning you can sue someone for these actions in a civil court to get compensated for your injuries.

In Texas, the elements for a case against a defendant for assault and battery are the same, although there are many different classifications for different degrees of the offense (charged as “assault” even if battery does occur).

  • Intentionally or knowingly threatens another with imminent bodily injury, including the person’s spouse
  • Intentionally or knowingly causes physical contact with another when the person knows or should reasonably believe that the other will regard the contact as offensive or provocative

Classifications of the Offense

  • Class C misdemeanor if a person threatens another with bodily harm or causes physical contact in a provocative or offensive way, and no other aggravating factors are present.
  • Class B misdemeanor if a person commits assault against someone who is a sports participant during a performance or in retaliation for a performance.
  • Class A misdemeanor if a person causes bodily injury to another, and no other aggravating factors are present; or if a person causes physical contact in a provocative or offensive way against an elderly individual.

In many states assault and battery are treated as two separate crimes, although some treat them as the same. The reason for this is because the offenses are very closely linked: “assault” occurs when someone threatens another with imminent bodily injury, while “battery” refers to actual bodily contact ( which is either offensive or injurious in nature). Assault and battery also are considered intentional offenses, meaning you can sue someone for these actions in a civil court to get compensated for your injuries.

In Texas, the elements for a case against a defendant for assault and battery are the same, although there are many different classifications for different degrees of the offense (charged as “assault” even if the battery does occur).

  • Intentionally or knowingly threatens another with imminent bodily injury, including the person’s spouse
  • Intentionally or knowingly causes physical contact with another when the person knows or should reasonably believe that the other will regard the contact as offensive or provocative

Classifications of the Offense

  • Class C misdemeanor if a person threatens another with bodily harm or causes physical contact in a provocative or offensive way, and no other aggravating factors are present.
  • Class B misdemeanor if a person commits assault against someone who is a sports participant during a performance or in retaliation for a performance.
  • Class A misdemeanor if a person causes bodily injury to another, and no other aggravating factors are present; or if a person causes physical contact in a provocative or offensive way against an elderly individual.

If you or your loved one is in need of representation for a criminal charge, LaHood Norton is ready to help. For a free review of your case contact the Law Offices of LaHood Norton at (210) 797-7700 Monday – Friday. The legal system can be overwhelming. You need a legal team that will take your case seriously and fight for you.